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Archive for July 2010

links for 2010-07-30

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  • Not surprisingly, the opaqueness of these books has led to the myth that compilers are hard to write.

    The best source for breaking this myth is Jack Crenshaw's series, Let's Build a Compiler!, which started in 1988. This is one of those gems of technical writing where what's assumed to be a complex topic ends up being suitable for a first year programming class. He focuses on compilers of the Turbo Pascal class: single pass, parsing and code generation are intermingled, and only the most basic of optimizations are applied to the resulting code. The original tutorials used Pascal as the implementation language, but there's a C version out there, too. If you're truly adventurous, Marcel Hendrix has done a Forth translation (and as Forth is an interactive language, it's easier to experiment with and understand than the C or Pascal sources).

  • Cmdlets are the heart-and-soul of Windows PowerShell, Microsoft's new command shell/scripting language. This series provides a task-based introduction to Windows PowerShell cmdlets: rather than focusing on the individual cmdlets themselves, the emphasis is on the tasks you can carry out using those cmdlets. These tasks include everything from reading and writing text files to managing event logs to sorting and filtering data.
    (tags: dev powershell)
  • This is your guide to getting started with Windows PowerShell. Read through these pages to get familiar with Windows PowerShell, and soon you’ll be driving around like a pro.
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Written by dstelow

July 30, 2010 at 11:03 pm

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links for 2010-07-28

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July 28, 2010 at 11:03 pm

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links for 2010-07-27

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July 27, 2010 at 11:03 pm

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links for 2010-07-26

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July 26, 2010 at 11:03 pm

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links for 2010-07-23

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July 23, 2010 at 11:01 pm

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links for 2010-07-22

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Written by dstelow

July 22, 2010 at 11:01 pm

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links for 2010-07-20

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  • In the first article in this series, I walked through the basics of cascading style sheets (CSS) and showed how CSS can make your code easier to maintain. CSS allows you to keep your presentation rules separate from your content, and I showed you some of the benefits this separation provides. In this article, I’ll move forward with CSS and describe how to position elements on a page.

    The first step in understanding how to position elements is to understand the fundamental model of CSS—the box model.

  • n this video Chris Pels shows how to do the fundamentals of object oriented programming (OOP) with JavaScript. First, the concept of a class constructor is discussed which uses the function() statement. As part of that discussion the importance of the "new" keyword for instantiating instances of the class as compared to just executing a function are covered. Next, creating dynamic properties for single instances of classes are reviewed as well as properties that exist for all instances of a class. Then adding methods to classes is discussed including how to encapsulate methods in the class and create private methods. Different syntaxes for creating class methods are also shown.
  • …given kits to do so, and basically told to go at it. Included in this kit was an Atmel ATMega644PA on a school-made programmer and evaluation board.
  • This page is the top of an HTML version of the Usenet comp.lang.c Frequently Asked Questions list (also known as the "clc FAQ").
    (tags: dev c)
  • This looks cool…3D Color LED Graphics Display – This 3-dimensional graphics display system which named as MaJaTron consists of 125 RGB LEDs arranged in a cube of 5×5×5 dimension. Each LED is a multicolor Red, Green and Blue LED and the control circuit of the system can individually control the intensity of each color, thereby, creating a full color, graphics system. Each LED is independently controllable. To control these 125 LEDs, a control circuit consisting of 13 AVR Microcontrollers ATMega32 is used.

Written by dstelow

July 20, 2010 at 11:03 pm

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